Album News: Working with the Lathe Revival.

I’ve been playing Traditional Irish Music for 41 years now and in the back of my mind I thought I’d like to make a flute album. A few years ago I decided to make music a central part of my everyday life and see what  might happen.

Last year the great flute player Aoife Granville posted a link to the Ó Riada Gold Medal competition in Cork and suggested I entered (There’s details about the competition on another post on here). Although I didn’t win, the weekend in Cork, playing with other finalists and musicians and attended workshops on working professionally as Traditional Musician, gave me great inspiration. It’s leap year this year so on that extra day of this year I took a leap and told people that I was going to make my first solo album.

By coincidence I had a message from Michael McGoldrick about teaching the child of a friend of his. The conversation turned to my project and Michael offered to record the album at his studio in Manchester. So far guide tracks have been recorded and I am working with a number of musicians on arrangements.

I’m juggling this with being a stay at home dad (I am very lucky to be doing this), teaching privately and at the University of Sheffield Music Department as well working on my PhD on Asturian Flute playing.

The first track is complete, recorded up in Newcastle with the wonderful Lathe Revival. The video below is a taster of the track and explains how it came about. I hope you enjoy it. The full video will be released shortly. Let me know what you think and what it evokes for you.

Cheers,

Mike.

 

Whitby Folk Week #Tunesday Tunes for May & June 2016

I’ve been very lucky to have some great friends to play with over the years and especially in Sheffield. Some of these friends came up trumps with some fabulous music in May and June. We were also joined by some of the Birmingham trad massive, Oisín Cooke and Sean Stapleton.

Thank you to everyone who has participated so far. Some great music was added on the Whitby Folk Week Facebook Community Page from China, England and Wales. Take a look if you get a chance.

July #Tunesday will come from Asturias……. feel free to record and add your own…….

Salud!

 

 

 

Whitby Folk Week Tunesday April 2016

I was delighted to persuade my very talented wife, Sarah Dalrymple and my old pal Bridie Cox to make some music. I also added a video of me playing a a jig I wrote for my Daughter.

Dr Sarah Dalrymple playing a Breton tune. She’ll be performing with Gaorsach Rapper & Step during Whitby Folk Week 2016.

Bridie Cox, my neighbour growing up in Stockport and now resident in County Clare, lilts the Chicago Reel:

I play Celeste’s Jig on my Ormiston Flute:

More special guests to follow next month. Don’t forget to check www.whitbyfolk.co.uk for all the latest on who’s been confirmed for Whitby Folk Week 2016.

 

Irish Tin Whistle Workshop for MA Music Students @ The University of Sheffield

Over Easter 2016, 10 distance learning music students came from across Europe, North Africa and the USA came to The University of Sheffield Music Department to take part in a residential for the M.A.’s in World Music and Music of the British Isles. Participants come from a variety of backgrounds but with a shared interest in what FRoots Magazine so aptly describes as ‘local music from around the world’. It’s an opportunity for students to meet each other, have face to face contact with lecturers and get hands on experience in playing music or an instrument that maybe somewhat different from their own specialism.

I was asked to provide a workshop on Traditional Irish Music on the Tin Whistle. Apart from one Irish musician, the musicians had little or no experience of playing Irish music and all were more or less starting learning from scratch. It was a great advantage that they were talented musicians in their own field. A big focus was learning by ear, that is learning without the use of written notation. For most Traditional Irish musicians this is a skill developed early on in the learning process but for others used to staff notation in particularly classically trained musicians, this is quite a challenge. The students took the task with gusto, covering the basic scales of D and G, cultural and geographical contexts, ornamentation (Cuts, taps, rolls and crans) and the importance of posture and relaxation when playing. We covered several lessons’ worth of information in 2 hours, learned the first part of the Mountains of Pomeroy March played on very challenging Clarke’s Whistle’s and by request, I played a couple of tunes on my flute form Asturias and Ireland. The students were a great group of people to work with and a good bit of laughter was had as well as a couple of beers in the bar afterwards. I want to thank them for tackling the task with such great spirit and at the end of the session they made a lovely sound.

Michael Walsh with students from his Trad Irish Tin Whistle Workshop at The University of Sheffield
Michael Walsh with students from his Trad Irish Tin Whistle Workshop at The University of Sheffield

I was inspired to teach a march by two things recently. Firstly discussing the flute band tradition in Dingle, Ireland with Dr Aoife Granville and the recent use of marshal music as part of the Centenary Celebrations of the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland. The Mountain’s of Pomeroy was part of the first March set I learned from Marian Flannery (Egan) at St Wilfrid’s Comhaltas Branch in Hulme, Manchester during the 1970’s. I still love playing a March when I’m playing with The Leeds Céilí Band.

Here’s the March we were learning and below is a list of references I mentioned during the presentation. There’s also further information on Sligo style music in some of my previous blogs.

Dr Aoife Granville’s work on Marching Traditions in Kerry.
http://www.academia.edu/13415326/Musicking_and_Marching_through_the_Year

Relaxing whilst playing: ‘The Inner Game of Music’ by Barry Green. London: Pan 1987.

Traditional Irish Music Workshop with The University of Sheffield Folk Group

I was delighted to be asked to deliver a workshop on Traditional Irish Music with the University of Sheffield Folk Group. They were specifically interested in me sharing some of my knowledge and perspective on Sligo style flute playing, the style that I was I taught by Marian Flannery (Egan) in 1970’s Manchester. I had an hour to work with a group of very talented musicians, but musicians not too familiar with the technicalities of Traditional Irish Music. To explain Sligo style (if there is an exact defined style?) is a big task and our session could only ever be a drop in a large ocean.

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The Folk Group meet at the Bath Hotel in Sheffield every week and play a variety of styles of folk music on a number of different instruments. They are mixture of undergraduate, postgraduate and staff. All were welcoming and keen for some hands on learning rather than a lecture. I gave a little outline of my learning and influences including my flute hero Roger Sherlock:

https://youtu.be/ZdfU2Gc1ZlE

I talked about some different perspectives on style ranging from Séamus Tansey and his highly ornate music through to players such as Sherlock, who had a little more space in their playing. We talked about rhythm and the concept of a pulse in the music (there’s a PhD in there for someone). The video below demonstrates, in a humorous and perhaps extreme way, the differing schools of thought on what is ‘authentic’.

https://youtu.be/m1m1KMtIjWA

I handed out a Clarke’s Tin Whistle to each of the participants. They’re easy to get the hang of, six finger holes and blow in the end. We did a quick run through of the scale of D and focused the rest of the session on basic techniques (cuts, taps, rolls, breath control) and learning a tune by ear. I won’t go into detail here about technique. There are some great on-line resources on technique. I would also recommend Hammy Hamilton’s ‘The Irish Flute Players Handbook’. If you are a University of Sheffield library member, I’ve ordered the book and it should be available in the next couple of weeks. You can also order a copy direct from Hammy. It has a wealth of historical context, an accompanying CD and tunes for you to learn.

http://www.hamiltonflutes.com/The_Irish_Flute_Players_Handbook.html

Within the hour the group managed to learn the first part of the Jig, ‘The Whistling Banshee’ by ‘ear’ (listening without notation) and add a couple of ornaments to the tune. Here are slow and correct tempo versions of the tune:

As I explained to the group, it’s hard to pin down an exact version of the tune and as you will see even more difficult to agreement on the name of the tune. If you do need to refer to notation, www.thesession.org is a great resource for different versions of the tune in ABC and staff notation (the dots). Here’s a link to The Whistling Banshee/ Lilting Banshee/ Paddy Macs on The Session:

https://thesession.org/tunes/60

The University of Sheffield Folk Group have an ambitious programme of worshops ahead with the likes of Nancy Kerr, Fay Hield (founder of the group) and Jon Boden (Bellowhead) amongst others. Keep an eye out for them gigging near you some time soon. Thank you to them all for asking me to work with them.

My next workshop is later this month with the students on the MA in Music of the British Isles at the University of Sheffield.

If you would like me to deliver a workshop for you, in English or Spanish, get in contact with me: mpwalsh1@sheffield.ac.uk and check out my ‘traddad for hire’ section on here.

Competing at The Seán Ó Riada Gold Medal / Bhonn Óir Seán Ó Riada

I am delighted to be shortlisted for the Seán Ó Riada Gold Medal Competition in Cork on Friday 5th February 2016. I’ll be competing with 14 other flute and tinwhistle players performing two pieces of Traditional Irish Music each on the night. The emphasis is on the spirit and feel of the music rather than technical excellence alone.

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Photo: Diane Cusack.

The medal has been designed by Cashel goldsmith Pádraig Ó Mathúna and features an engraving of Sean Ó Riada on one side, and a representation of the poem Dán Aimhirgín (Song of Amergin) on the other. The medal consists of 2 silver plates back to back, and following the competition on Friday Pádraig will engrave the winners name and the year into the medal, and it will then be coated in gold
 

Peadar Ó Riada explains:

‘In their search for the gold medalist, the adjudicators will be looking for a musician who has technical proficiency on the instrument, has a musicality in their playing, and a variety in their choice of 5 pieces that illustrate the broad range of rhythms and melody in traditional Gaelic music. They will also be looking for the character found in music from musicians whose life experience and witness grows with age and which invests their music. As Irish music is an art form and requires creative input from the musician, this character is of great importance and should be real rather then faked or imitated from other great musicians. In other words, the adjudicators would rather purchase a recording of, say, Micho Russel, Packie Duignan, Willy Clancey, Denis Murphy, Lad O Beirne, Jamsie Byrne, Seamus Ennis, Joe Cooley, Johnny Leary, Mrs Elizabeth Crotty or Turlough O Caralon or any modern day super harp player say rather then listen to hundreds of imitations. The adjudicators wish the to hear the musician’s own character in their playing – without exaggeration.. This would suggest that whilst technique is important, age and experience is equally so’.

I heartily agree with this sentiment and look forward to celebrating Irish Traditional Music with the other participants in a weekend of music.

You can listen on line from 7pm at:

http://www.rte.ie/rnag/

or watch at:

http://www.cuireadhchunceoil.ie/

I’ll let you know how I get on.

As part of the weekend there is a Musicians’ Convention on Saturday 6 February in the Rochestown Park Hotel. The convention is ‘intended to help and advise traditional musicians on a host of subjects. It will run from 2 pm to 5 pm, with speakers from the music industry giving talks on funding opportunities, publicity, insurance, copyright, marketing and publishing, amongst other topics. Speakers will include representatives from IMRO, the Arts Council and Gael Linn, and entry is €5. Musicians interested should register by emailing claru@cuireadhchunceoil.ie’.

Further details:

http://goo.gl/460qjP

Whitby Folk Week Facebook ‘Tunesday’ Music Videos.

A few months ago I was asked by my good friend Sally Smith to help promote The Whitby Folk Week by ‘curating’ a series of videos,posted monthly on their Facebook page, of musicians playing tunes that you might hear at Whitby Folk Week. The ‘not for profit’ Folk Week happens towards the end of August every year when the small Yorkshire seaside town is filled with folk enthusiasts playing tunes, dancing folk dances, telling stories, singing songs, attending concerts and catching up with fellow folkies.

I’m fairly new to Folk Week. It has always been a time of year where I was in Ireland for the All Ireland Fleadh or walking in the mountains of Asturias. My wife’s family have been attending and performing for much of the 50 years it has been running and so when we had family it became part of my tradition, largely carrying dance kitbags for my wife and pushing the children around in the buggy. I love the relaxed atmosphere of the town, Silver Street Fish and Chips, ice-cream at the sea front and sitting watching the North Sea from a beach hut.

A couple of years ago I was asked to run a Trad Irish Flute workshop, which I really enjoyed and last year I got time to get out in the evening to a few of the Irish pub sessions. The highlight of the sessions for me was a tune at The Granby Hotel organised by Whitby bon vivant and bodhrán player extrordinaire, Mr Tommy Randall. It was first time Irish music had been played in there in 35 years. A change of regime and the energy of Tommy, created something special. I hope to keep some of the spirit of that going the videos as well as highlight other styles of music on offer such as English Dance Music and Eurosession.

Production standards are sometimes less than Hollywood standards, as I juggle work, playing, looking after my children and studying. But I’m slowly getting better at it and learning. By the time summer comes they could by looking swish. I hope to catch you for a tune along the way and if you want to add a video of you playing a tune please feel free.

Here’s some of the previous videos and look out for other monthly offerings such as: ‘Toesday’ – Dance videos, Pic-Tures-Day – Archive pictures, Troubaday – Songs and when there’s an extra Tuesday in the month there’s a surprise.

Tunesday is first Tuesday of the month: href=”https://www.facebook.com/groups/129958666651/?fref=ts”>

Further details of the Folkweek:

Videos:

Mike Walsh playing The Beautiful Goldfinch Waltz (written by Marcus Hernon):

Mike Walsh playing The Killavil Jig:

Ciarán Boyle & Mike Walsh playing a festive Willie Coleman’s Jig at Flynn’s Pub, Sheffield. December 2015.

John Garner plays two French tunes:

Brogan McAuliffe & Mike Walsh playing ‘Trip to Birmingham’ by Josie McDermott, recording at The University of Sheffield Sound House. January 2016.

I’ll post further videos when I get permission and/or receive links.